Low tech strategies

If you are preparing for Fall 2021, please refer to the Flexible Teaching website, which features a series of guides for course design, delivery, and materials. Flexible Teaching is an approach to course design and delivery that helps students learn and succeed in any mode – face to face, online, or hybrid. Learn more and get started at flexteaching.li.duke.edu.

  • If your students and/or you cannot access the internet – you can still hold meetings and discussions via phone conferences. You can use Zoom to set up an audio-only conference.
  • Assign supplemental writing prompts to be completed by students either individually or in groups (students can use any platform they are comfortable with to complete the work).
  • Assign supplemental problem sets and case studies to be completed by students either individually or in groups (students can use any platform they are comfortable with to complete the work).
  • Have students listen to podcasts that apply course content to novel or contemporary applications. Have students create podcasts (perhaps recording on their mobile phones and uploading to Duke Box) explaining course content to lay audiences or to members of their academic community.
  • Assign supplemental readings and have students apply them to cases or writing prompts (either individually or in groups).
  • Send out your slide deck to the class and ask them to annotate the slides to show their understanding of the content. This can be done individually or in groups.
  • Send out your slide deck and ask students to video themselves teaching the content to their peers. These videos can be uploaded to Sakai so all students in the class can watch.
  • Have students create TED talks applying course content to a new application. If the primary objective is to practice presenting to peers, students can film themselves speaking and upload the videos to Sakai. If the primary objective is writing the application, students can write the script for the TED talk but not actually perform it.
  • Send out discussion prompts and students can have discussions in online chat spaces of their choosing. They can submit the transcript of the discussion as evidence of the conversation.
  • Ask students to work collaboratively to generate review guides for final exams/projects.
  • Assign students to take exams at home in open-note/open-book formats to mitigate potential academic misconduct.